MEDIA RELEASE: Poll finds North Carolinians favor raising revenue to restore budget cuts to key public services

Research from Together NC shows voter support for the Earned Income Tax Credit, ensuring that corporations and wealthy households pay fair share

RALEIGH (May 22, 2012) – North Carolinians support raising revenue to restore budget cuts to key public services such as education, poll results released this morning by the Together NC coalition show.

The poll shows support for ensuring that corporations and wealthy households pay their fair share, and extending North Carolina’s Earned Income Tax Credit. Together NC commissioned the poll from Public Policy Polling to gauge public support for its policy platform launched as its “North Carolina’s Worth It” campaign last week.

“This poll tells us that North Carolina voters are willing to pay more to restore deep cuts to key public investments, and voters in both parties are tired of corporations and the wealthy getting a free ride,” said Louisa Warren, co-coordinator of Together NC.  “The results also show that legislative leaders have been pursuing a direction that is the exact opposite of what voters want.” 

An overwhelming majority – 80 percent – of those polled supported requiring profitable out-of-state corporations to accurately report and pay their state taxes, rejecting allowances for corporations that deprive the state millions of dollars by underreporting their profits. 62 percent of those polled supported increasing the tax rate on those who make over $1 million per year. In the 2011 legislative session, lawmakers passed a bill to weaken the Department of Revenue’s ability to require combined reporting.

Extending North Carolina’s Earned Income Tax Credit was also popular, with more than 60 percent supporting extending the EITC – a tax credit that encourages work, reduces taxes on working families, and lifts children out of poverty – which is set to expire at the end of this year. In addition, more than half of those polled supported reinstating the temporary one-cent increase in the sales tax, which expired in 2011.

The poll, taken by Public Policy Polling from May 14-15, surveyed 695 North Carolina voters. The complete breakdown of the poll can be viewed here.

For details on Together NC’s revenue plan, visit here.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: Louisa Warren, coordinator, Together NC, louisa@ncjustice.org; (919) 801-0465; Jeff Shaw, director of communications, NC Justice Center, (503) 551-3615.