Immigrants are vital to North Carolina's economy and cultural fabric

North Carolina has long benefited from the immeasurable economic contributions of its immigrant populations. Coming from all over the world, immigrants play a vital role in the Tar Heel state as neighbors, entrepreneurs, consumers and taxpayers. Immigrants help position North Carolina for growth and cultural vitality, bringing with them ingenuity and a variety of languages, practices and beliefs. Put simply, immigrants share Tar Heel values—they work hard to provide for their families and to make the state a more prosperous, connected and successful place to live for all North Carolinians.

This interactive map displays demographic trends as well as data on immigrants' contributions to the labor force and economy in North Carolina.

Note: The below is a placeholder image, the interactive map is best viewed with Adobe Flash Player, get the free player here from Adobe's website.
Map of Percent of NC Population that is Foreign-Born (2007-2011; 5-year Estimate), by county

*This map uses "immigrant" to generally describe a foreign-born person living in the United States, regardless of their immigration status or whether they have become a United States citizen. All county-level data comes from the 2007-2011 American Community survey conducted by the United States Census Bureau. County-level data should not be compared to state-level data due to the use of different point-in-time surveys.

Related Resources:

 

 

Sources for data in graphic:
1. United States Bureau of the Census. 2011 American Community Survey; 2000 Decennial Census.
2. Data reflects point-in-time estimate. Department of Homeland Security. "Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population Residing in the United States: January 2011." March 2012. Available at http://www.dhs.gove/xlibrary/assets/statistics/publications/ois_ill_pe_2... and, United States Bureau of the Census. 2011 American Community Survey.
3. United States Bureau of the Census. 2011 American Community Survey.
4. United States Bureau of the Census. 2011 American Community Survey.
5. United States Bureau of the Census. 2011 American Community Survey.
6. United States Bureau of the Census. 2011 American Community Survey.
7. Urban Institute. "Children of Immigrants: Growing National and State Diversity." October 2011. Available here: http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412433-children-of-immigrants-brief5-na... (page 9)
8. United States Bureau of the Census. 2011 American Community Survey.
9. Economic Policy Institute analysis of the 2009-2011 American Community Survey.
10. Economic Policy Institute analysis of the 2009-2011 American Community Survey.
11. Economic Policy Institute analysis of the 2009-2011 American Community Survey.
12. United States Bureau of the Census. 2011 American Community Survey.