NC Unemployment Rate Twice As Bad For African-Americans As For Whites

 NC Unemployment Rate Twice As Bad For African-Americans As For Whites

New report shows an “uneven jobs recovery” is causing a higher unemployment rate for African-Americans in North Carolina, compared to white North Carolinians and African-Americans elsewhere in the country
 
RALEIGH (April 28, 2011) – African-Americans in North Carolina face an unemployment rate nearly double that of their white counterparts, says a new report released today. Moreover, North Carolina’s African-American population suffers from higher unemployment than African-Americans nationwide.
 
The study, co-released by the Economic Policy Institute and the NC Budget & Tax Center, finds that North Carolina has the seventh highest African American unemployment rate among the 22 states that have large enough African American sample sizes to provide reliable measurements using U.S. Census Bur eau Current Population Survey data.
 
“Every community in North Carolina has suffered through the Great Recession,” said Alexandra Forter Sirota, director of the NC Budget & Tax Center, “but African-Americans have taken a particularly painful hit.”
 
African American unemployment rates in North Carolina rose from 8.1% at the beginning of the Great Recession to a high of 17.6% in the fi rst quarter of 2010. In North Carolina the unemployment rate for African Americans averaged 17.2% in 2010, which is nearly twice the 8.6% rate for white North Carolinians and higher than the 15.9% average for African Americans across the country.
 
The relatively high unemployment rate among African Americans in North Carolina is noteworthy given their comparatively large (and growing) share of the state’s population. In 2010, African Americans comprised 21% of North Carolina’s population, following a 17% increase in population over the preceding decade (during which the overall population increased 18.5% and the white non-Hispanic population increased 10%).
 
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Alexandra Forter Sirota, BTC director, 919.861.1468, alexandra@ncjustice.org; Jeff Shaw, director of communications, 503.551.3615, jeff@ncjustice.org.
 
 
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